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Why does Linux not get viruses?
There are several reasons why Linux is safe from viruses. For example:
  • As mentioned already, Linux doesn't let users damage the system by modifying important files. This is how viruses work: when they run, they copy themselves deep into the system so they can wreak havoc on your work. With Linux, this can't happen - a virus can't infect your system because it can't modify the files without your permission.
  • Unlike Windows, Linux doesn't let you double-click on files you downloaded from the web to run them. This is the source of many Windows problems - someone creates a virus-infected executable file called hello.txt.exe, and when users see it they think it's just called hello.txt because Windows hides the .exe extension. When they try to open the "text" file, they actually run the program. With Linux, you would see a warning message saying, "this file is executable. Do you want to display its contents or run it?"
  • Because Linux has so many different choices for programs, it's much harder for hackers to exploit particular situations. For example, even if it's possible that an Ubuntu user running Firefox could be infected with a virus somehow, that same virus might fail for users running Fedora and Konqueror, or OpenSUSE and Epiphany. As a result, the number of people that can be target with a Linux virus is smaller, so many hackers just don't bother.
There are many virus scanners available for Linux, but most of them are there to scan for Windows viruses. The reason for this is that even though your Linux box is immune to nearly every virus in existence, it's possible that a Windows user could give you an infected file which you then pass on to someone else - it won't hurt you at all, but if you can clean the virus it helps protect those poor Windows users a bit more!
Does Linux need a firewall?
How can I reset my password?
Does Linux need antivirus software?

 

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Why does Linux not get viruses?
There are several reasons why Linux is safe from viruses. For example:
  • As mentioned already, Linux doesn't let users damage the system by modifying important files. This is how viruses work: when they run, they copy themselves deep into the system so they can wreak havoc on your work. With Linux, this can't happen - a virus can't infect your system because it can't modify the files without your permission.
  • Unlike Windows, Linux doesn't let you double-click on files you downloaded from the web to run them. This is the source of many Windows problems - someone creates a virus-infected executable file called hello.txt.exe, and when users see it they think it's just called hello.txt because Windows hides the .exe extension. When they try to open the "text" file, they actually run the program. With Linux, you would see a warning message saying, "this file is executable. Do you want to display its contents or run it?"
  • Because Linux has so many different choices for programs, it's much harder for hackers to exploit particular situations. For example, even if it's possible that an Ubuntu user running Firefox could be infected with a virus somehow, that same virus might fail for users running Fedora and Konqueror, or OpenSUSE and Epiphany. As a result, the number of people that can be target with a Linux virus is smaller, so many hackers just don't bother.
There are many virus scanners available for Linux, but most of them are there to scan for Windows viruses. The reason for this is that even though your Linux box is immune to nearly every virus in existence, it's possible that a Windows user could give you an infected file which you then pass on to someone else - it won't hurt you at all, but if you can clean the virus it helps protect those poor Windows users a bit more!
Does Linux need a firewall?
It doesn't need a firewall, but it's always smart to have extra protection. However, if you're thinking, "great, I should go out and buy Symantec Ultra Firewall Plus Premium Pack 2010", please don't: your distro probably already comes with a firewall, it just doesn't need to shout about it with splash screens and such.
How can I reset my password?
If you have forgotten your user password, then there are two ways of resetting it. First, if you created a root user password, then just login with the username "root" and your root password. Then you should be able to amend the password for your normal user account to something that you can remember. Alternatively, if you have no root password set, you need to reboot your PC and use the boot load to make the change. So, when Linux asks you what you want to boot up, press "e" choose the line starting with the word "kernel" then press "e" again, then put the word "single" at the end of the line and press Enter to make it boot up. When it's finished, run the command "passwd" to change the root password.
Does Linux need antivirus software?
There are many virus scanners available for Linux, but most of them are there to scan for Windows viruses. The reason for this is that even though your Linux box is immune to nearly every virus in existence, it's possible that a Windows user could give you an infected file which you then pass on to someone else - it won't hurt you at all, but if you can clean the virus it helps protect those poor Windows users a bit more!

 

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Why does Linux not get viruses?
Does Linux need a firewall?
How can I reset my password?
Does Linux need antivirus software?